Shipping Industry Expresses Concern Over Recent Trade Developments

0 comments

Shipping Industry Expresses Concern Over Recent Trade Developments |

in International Shipping News 15/05/2019

A delegation from the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), the Asian Shipowners’ Association (ASA) and the European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA) has, at the World Trade Organization (WTO) in Geneva, expressed concern over recent increases in protectionist measures. Presenting two position papers to the WTO, the shipping sector has “fully committed to the preservation and promotion of free trade policies and principles around the world.”

This comes at a time when trade barriers are becoming more prevalent and represent a worrying trend for the delivery of sustainable economic growth. The papers highlight that there has been a seven fold increase in import-restrictive trade measures since 2017. This represents an additional USD 588.3 billion of additional costs to global trade. The importance of this representation has been given heightened relevance following the decision by the United States of America to increase import tariffs on certain goods from China.

Addressing the WTO Simon Bennett, ICS Deputy Secretary General said: “It is no coincidence that the massive growth in the global economy and thus the demand for maritime services that has been seen over the past 25 years has followed the WTO’s establishment in 1995. Global maritime trade now exceeds ten billion tonnes of cargo a year, but the efficiency of the shipping sector is dependent on a rules based trading system. This requires the negotiation and adherence to multilateral trade agreements under the auspices of the WTO. Recently this success story has been the subject of unwarranted criticism and threat by certain governments, including the United States, undermining the WTO’s role as the regulator of international trade. There are no winners when you increase unilateral tariffs, which is why the best place to address disputes is at the WTO.”

137 new trade-restrictive measures were put in place between 2017 and 2018 which have added significant burden and cost to the free movement of goods.

Speaking in the margins of the WTO negotiations on e-commerce, Lieselot Marinus, Director of Shipping & Trade Policy at ECSA said: “We are concerned at the growth of sector specific protectionist measures, particularly cargo reservation whereby the carriage of international cargoes is restricted to national flag ships, undermining fair competition and a global level playing field.”

Captain Ang Chin Eng, Secretary General of the ASA added: “The global shipping sector is calling on the global community and WTO Member States to continue to support the WTO and its various functions, which help to govern and maintain the efficient operation of global trade in the best interests of all nations.”

ICS, ASA and ECSA representing the shipping industry which is responsible for the carriage of about 90% of world trade, asserted that the shipping sector still needs to see progress being made under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS).

Shipowners are encouraging WTO Member States to ensure that bilateral agreements and regional agreements – including those which relate to shipping and maritime transport services – do not conflict with their current national schedules of commitments, as agreed within the framework of the WTO.
Source: International Chamber of Shipping

Leave a Reply

SSCP   CAS-002   9L0-066   350-050   642-999   220-801   74-678   642-732   400-051   ICGB   c2010-652   70-413   101-400   220-902   350-080   210-260   70-246   1Z0-144   3002   AWS-SYSOPS   70-347   PEGACPBA71V1   220-901   70-534   LX0-104   070-461   HP0-S42   1Z0-061   000-105   70-486   70-177   N10-006   500-260   640-692   70-980   CISM   VCP550   70-532   200-101   000-080   PR000041   2V0-621   70-411   352-001   70-480   70-461   ICBB   000-089   70-410   350-029   1Z0-060   2V0-620   210-065   70-463   70-483   CRISC   MB6-703   1z0-808   220-802   ITILFND   1Z0-804   LX0-103   MB2-704   210-060   101   200-310   640-911   200-120   EX300   300-209   1Z0-803   350-001   400-201   9L0-012   70-488   JN0-102   640-916   70-270   100-101   MB5-705   JK0-022   350-060   300-320   1z0-434   350-018   400-101   350-030   000-106   ADM-201   300-135   300-208   EX200   PMP   NSE4   1Z0-051   c2010-657   C_TFIN52_66   300-115   70-417   9A0-385   70-243   300-075   70-487   NS0-157   MB2-707   70-533   CAP   OG0-093   M70-101   300-070   102-400   JN0-360   SY0-401   000-017   300-206   CCA-500   70-412   2V0-621D   70-178   810-403   70-462   OG0-091   1V0-601   200-355   000-104   700-501   70-346   CISSP   300-101   1Y0-201   200-125  , 200-125  , 100-105  , 100-105  , CISM   NS0-157   350-018  , NS0-157   ICBB  , N10-006 test  , 350-050   70-534   70-178   220-802   102-400   000-106   70-411  , 400-101   100-101  , NS0-157   1Z0-803   200-125  , 210-060   400-201   350-050   C_TFIN52_66  , JN0-102  , 200-355   JN0-360   70-411   350-018  , 70-412   350-030   640-916   000-105   100-105  , 70-270  , 70-462   300-070  , 300-070   642-999   101-400   PR000041   200-101  , 350-030   300-070  , 70-270  , 400-051   200-120   70-178   9L0-012   70-487   LX0-103   100-105  ,