Brexit deadline looms for Asia-bound...

Brexit deadline looms for Asia-bound ships as slow boats to China set sail from the UK in International Shipping...

posted on: Feb 16, 2019

GLOBAL LNG-Asian prices drop to...

GLOBAL LNG-Asian prices drop to 17-month low on tepid demand in General Energy News 16/02/2019 Asian spot prices for...

GLOBAL LNG-Asian prices drop to 17-month low on tepid demand
posted on: Feb 16, 2019

Weekly Vessel Valuations Report, February...

Weekly Vessel Valuations Report, February 12 2019 in Weekly Vessel Valuations Report 12/02/2019 Tankers: Tanker values have remained stable....

Weekly Vessel Valuations Report, February 12 2019
posted on: Feb 16, 2019

Deal inked to prepare Payra...

Deal inked to prepare Payra Port master plan UNB Dhaka Tribune February 14th, 2019 ‘Consultancy Services for Preparation of...

Deal inked to prepare Payra Port master plan
posted on: Feb 14, 2019
Photos: Wreck of WWII Carrier USS Hornet Discovered

Photos: Wreck of WWII Carrier USS Hornet Discovered...

posted on: Feb 13, 2019

Photos: Wreck of WWII Carrier USS Hornet Discovered USS Hornet after delivery in 1941 (USN) By MarEx 2019-02-12 The R/V Petrel, the research vessel backed by the investment company of late entrepreneur Paul Allen, has discovered another famous World War II wreck, the carrier USS Hornet. Hornet was the launch platform for the famed Doolittle Raid on Japan, the first American retaliatory strike in the wake of Pearl Harbor, and she was sunk by Japanese forces during the Solomon Islands campaign in 1942. Hornet was laid down in 1939 and delivered in October 1941, two months before the attack on Pearl Harbor. In February 1942, she took on several B-25 bombers for a test of the possibility of a long-range raid on the Japanese mainland. This top-secret mission received the green light, and in March, she took on 16 stripped-down B-25s and a specially-picked team of Army aviators. Under the command of...

Weekly Vessel Valuations Report, February 05 2019

Weekly Vessel Valuations Report, February 05 2019...

posted on: Feb 13, 2019

Weekly Vessel Valuations Report, February 05 2019 in Weekly Vessel Valuations Report 05/02/2019 Tanker: Values have remained stable across all tonnages. Bulker: Mid to old age Handy bulker tonnage has firmed. Taiwanese buyers have purchased the Kamsarmax resales, Hull 854 and Hull 855 (84,700 DWT, Apr and Aug 2019, Sasebo) from Transmed Shipping in an en bloc deal for USD 64.00 mil, VV en bloc value USD 65.35 mil. Panamax Minoan Flame (73,900 DWT, Mar 1998, Tadotsu Tsuneishi) sold for USD 6.25 mil, VV value USD 5.69 mil. Container: Mid age Post Panamax and Panamas tonnage has softened. No sales have been reported this...

Safety Management: Why Quality is important among

Safety Management: Why Quality is important among...

posted on: Feb 13, 2019

Credit: Shutterstock/ Mon Dela Share: Safety Management: Why Quality is important among shipping organizations There are numerous of questions arising concerning the term “quality”. Most of these questions are focusing on what quality is in practice and who actually defines the required items that make an organization quality compliant. Generally, quality refers to reliability, efficiency and good performance and seeks to reach all stakeholders’ satisfaction, as this is the major factor that defines the requirements on which the organization will finally focus on. Maritime Knowledge | 03/01/19 Read in the series Safety Management: Why Quality is important among shipping organizationsSafety Management: Measuring MaturitySafety Management: Safety Culture vs Safety Climate – What’s the difference?Safety Management: How can shipping companies become High Reliability Organizations?Safety Management: Why SMS are important As for the shipping organizations, quality is about all stakeholders’ satisfaction, but there is also another factor that it is very important...

How to make the future of ship recycling more responsible

How to make the future of ship recycling more responsible...

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

Credit: Shuttesrtock / Photo by: Markus Mainka How to make the future of ship recycling more responsible At the Global Maritime Forum’s Annual Summit last October, the Sustainable Shipping Initiative sat down with industry leaders to discuss the challenges and opportunities in shipping, explains Mr. Andrew Stephens, Executive Director, SSI and Nicole Rencoret, Head of Communications and Development, SSI Opinions | 11/02/19 Together we painted a picture of the future of responsible ship recycling, asking the question: “How can stakeholders across the maritime industry work together to make responsible ship recycling more sustainable?” Our answer: Be transparent! Sign up to the Ship Recycling Transparency Initiative. At GMF’s Annual Forum, SSI Executive Director Andrew Stephens led a session on ship recycling, captured in this graphic.Credit: GMF Standard Chartered welcomes the SRTI initiative to help create a level playing field in the ship recycling value chain through promoting transparency. Having demonstrated the positive role...

Marine Electric: The Wreck that Changed the Coast Guard Forever

Marine Electric: The Wreck that Changed the Coast Guard Forever...

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

Marine Electric: The Wreck that Changed the Coast Guard Forever By Corinne Zilnicki 2019-02-11 At midnight on February 12, 1983, the 605-foot cargo ship Marine Electric was sailing northward 30 miles off Virginia’s eastern shore, plowing slowly through the gale-force winds and waves stirred up by a winter storm. An able-bodied seaman relieved the watch and peered forward, noticing for the first time that the ship’s bow seemed to be riding unusually low in the water. Dense curls of green ocean rushed over the bow, some of them arching 10 feet over the deck before crashing back down. The crew had been battling 25-foot waves for hours, but until now, the bow had bucked and dipped as normal. Now it seemed only to dip. Over the next two hours, the waves intruded with increasing vigor. The entire foredeck was swallowed in six feet of water. The main deck was...

[Remember] Ways to Reduce Mooring Accidents

[Remember] Ways to Reduce Mooring Accidents

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

[Remember] Ways to Reduce Mooring Accidents Mooring operations are one of the dangerous tasks onboard ships.  The dangers associated with mooring operations are very real, regardless of experience.  The smallest of lapses, even those far from the mooring deck, can have significant consequences during mooring operations.  There have been various innovations across the maritime industry like the automated mooring technology, to reduce the hazards associated with traditional mooring systems.  Still majority of vessels rely on mooring arrangements involving ropes and winches.  These systems have benefits, as they are flexible and enable berthing at most ports.  However, the risks associated with operating traditional mooring systems continue to increase as vessels become larger. Risks involved in mooring: Poor overview Stopper breaksOil leak from winch – slip/injuryToo coldCrossing lineSea risingLines in mess on mooring boatWires/ropes tight and slack/or different material, elasticity and breaking strengthLine thrown without telling dockerStrong currentMoving to and froStanding in a...

Types of Rudders Used For Ships

Types of Rudders Used For Ships

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

Types of Rudders Used For Ships By Soumya Chakraborty | In: Naval Architecture | Last Updated on February 11, 2019 Types of Rudders Used For Ships Have you ever noticed that ships, unlike most aeroplanes do not have the same kinds of rudders? The type of rudder that would suit a particular ship is a decision that needs to be based on various factors like hull form, speed, propeller design, the structural arrangement of the stern, clearance between the propeller and the stern, and also a few hydrodynamic factors that dictate the flow of water aft of the propeller. How ship designers go about deciding the type of rudder, is actually an iterative process. In the concept ship design stage, we actually do not (or cannot afford to) decide the suitable rudder for the ship. So what designers and naval architects do is, estimate a very approximate dimension of...

India: Government Exploring New Avenues For Promotion Of Trade Through Coastal Shipping

India: Government Exploring New Avenues For Promotion Of Trade Through Coastal Shipping...

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

India: Government Exploring New Avenues For Promotion Of Trade Through Coastal Shipping The Government is exploring new avenues for promotion of shipping, commerce and trade through coastal shipping. A Coastal Shipping Agreement was signed between India and Bangladesh in June 2015. The Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) between the two countries was also signed in November 2015 to implement the Coastal Shipping Agreement. Representation Image – Photograph by Larriel Eleccion Details of trucks sent directly to Bangladesh through sea route since October 2017 are given below:- Image Credit: pib.nic.in Benefits of sending trucks through sea routes are (i) it reduces the load on rail and road traffic. it saves fuel consumption and offers a greener alternative to cargo movement.it is cost effective compared to the Road and Rail mode of transport.it reduces carbon footprint. As per the Agreement, sea transport from India to Bangladesh is treated as a coastal movement,...

Top 3 Robotic Solutions to Complete Ship & Hull Inspections

Top 3 Robotic Solutions to Complete Ship & Hull Inspections...

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

Top 3 Robotic Solutions to Complete Ship & Hull Inspections February 11, 2019 by Sponsored0 Article written and provided by Deep Trekker A vessel’s structural integrity, potential transferring of invasive species, or contraband smuggling demands periodic inspections of a vessel’s hull during transit and when entering port. Threats to our security are often hidden in underwater locations, placed to cause destruction. Formerly, divers were required to put themselves in harm’s way to discover and dispose of threats, however, Deep Trekker remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) provide an affordable, user-friendly way to perform marine surveys, ship hull inspections, and more without diver intervention. Challenges to Hull Inspections There are a number of challenges to conducting hull inspections underwater. Searches are carried out under conditions of limited or near zero visibility and can often be dangerous to humans, severely limiting the ability for inspection. Hull shapes can be complex – making orientation and navigation difficult...

Incident Video: Malaysian Vessel, Greek Bulk Carrier Collide in Singapore Waters...

posted on: Feb 12, 2019

Incident Video: Malaysian Vessel, Greek Bulk Carrier Collide in Singapore Waters February 11, 2019 by Bloomberg A screen grab of video published by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore. Photo: MPA By Saket Sundria (Bloomberg) — A Malaysian vessel and a Greek-registered bulk carrier collided in Singapore territorial waters off Tuas on Saturday, according to a statement from the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, which said it was “deeply concerned” by the intrusion. Malaysia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said late Saturday that the Greek vessel and its crew have been detained, the Straits Times reported. The Malaysian vessel, Polaris, was anchored while the Greek bulk carrier, Piraeus, was sailing at the time of the incident, and there were no injuries, according to the report. Polaris, a Malaysian Marine Department vessel, is one of the ships that allegedly trespassed into Singapore’s waters last year, according to the Straits Times report....

Trelleborg To Supply Smart Rope Free Mooring System To Port Of Langnas

Trelleborg To Supply Smart Rope Free Mooring System To Port Of Langnas...

posted on: Feb 11, 2019

Trelleborg To Supply Smart Rope Free Mooring System To Port Of Langnas February 7, 2019 Trelleborg’s marine systems operation will supply its rope-free automated mooring system, AutoMoor, to the Port of Langnas’ international cruise ferry and domestic ro-ro ferry berths. The Port of Langnas is situated in the Baltic Sea on the archipelago of Aland, which has intensive ferry traffic between Sweden and Finland via Aland. Developed following several years of customer consultations and recently successfully trialled at the Port of Melbourne in Australia, AutoMoor uses smart technologies to enable a faster berthing process and improve safety levels within the port environment. Image Credit: steinias.com Ronny Eriksson, CEO at the Port of Langnas, commented: “The port’s international cruise ferry berth alone accommodates nearly 3,000 vessel moorings per year. The majority of which are some of the most advanced cruise ferries worldwide with sizes ranging from 34,000GT to 66,000GT and...

Remote Monitoring of Confined Spaces Reduces Risks...

posted on: Feb 11, 2019

Remote Monitoring of Confined Spaces Reduces Risks By Mark Barker 2019-02-10 According to an International Dry Bulk Terminals Group study, there is a disturbing industry uptick in crewmember deaths in confined spaces. While human error is the root cause generally, there are technologies that ship managers may implement to prevent such tragedies from occurring.    Remote centralized confined-space monitoring systems compliant with OSHA’s confined-space entry standards may be set up either on the vessel or onshore to enhance safety and manage any issue quickly, acting as another layer of protection as crew members follow existing confined space entry procedures.  One significant advantage of a remote centralized confined space monitoring system is that it requires fewer workers to manage multiple confined space entries. Headcount required to monitor multiple confined spaces can be reduced eliminating the risk of exposure to a potential incident by up to 75 percent, according to Total...

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